“O”, it’s Othello… Black Star Film Season continues

Black Star Film Season is a celebration of the range and versatility of black actors on film taking place at Craigmillar Library.

The season runs until 22 May. These free screenings will encompass different genres, decades and styles for all audiences. Black and white.

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On Monday 27th March we are showing O (15) which takes William Shakespeare’s Othello onto the basketball courts of a high school. Film runs from 6 – 7.40 pm. Doors open at 5.15pm.

To book your place just contact Craigmillar Library by email craigmillar.library@edinburgh.gov.uk or phone 0131 529 5597.

Check out the full Black Star Film Season and save the dates!

Do The Right Thing on a Monday and come along to our free film season

Black Star Film Season is a celebration of the range and versatility of black actors on film taking place at Craigmillar Library.

The season runs until 22 May and opens with two special launch events funded by BFI Blackstar. These curated free screenings will encompass different genres, decades and styles for all audiences. Black and white.

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On Monday 27 February there’s the Spike Lee film Do The Right Thing (18). There will be music and food from 5.30pm and the film’s running time is 6 – 8.10pm. Doors open at 5.15pm.

On Monday 10 April you can watch the British Sci-fi film Attack The Block (15). Film runs from 6 – 7.30pm. Doors open at 5.15pm.

For the younger ones, come along on Monday 24 April and watch the animated Disney film The Princess & The Frog (U). Film runs from 3 – 4.40pm. Doors open at 2.30pm.

There’s a throwback to the 70s on Monday 8 May when Car Wash (PG) will be showing. Film runs from 6 – 7.40pm. Doors open at 5.30pm.

And finally ending with The Greatest on Monday 22 May Ali {15) starring Will Smith. Film runs from 5 – 7.45pm. Doors open at 4.30pm.

To book your place just contact Craigmillar Library by email craigmillar.library@edinburgh.gov.uk or phone 0131 529 5597.

Harpies, Fechters and Quines – Women around the World, 13 – 23 June

This year’s Harpies, Fechters and Quines 2-week events programme celebrates women’s cultural contribution to life in Edinburgh.

There is a wide range of events and exhibitions starting with the launch on 13 June and closing with the amazing poetry slam competition on 23 June at Out of the Blue in Leith.  Whether you are interested in women’s issues, literature, arts or simply learning about new things then you are warmly welcome to come along and meet other women with similar interests. We are sure you will be both entertained and informed.

See the full programme of events and book your place.

This Festival for women by women is the result of a partnership between the Bonnie Fechters, an Edinburgh Women’s Group, the Glasgow Women’s Library and Edinburgh Libraries.

 

More!fun Children’s Book Festival 24 – 27 May

This year’s festival a celebration of words inspiring children to enjoy reading, writing and other creative activities takes place in Craigmillar, Portobello and Piershill Libraries in the east of the City.

There are lots of activities for local primary schools but also events open to the public.

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Library staff are teaming up with Into Film, Puppet Animation Scotland, Edinburgh UNESCO City of Literature and the Scottish Poetry Library to deliver an exciting  programme of  creative writing and illustration workshops, animation screenings and lots more.

Book online to reserve a place

Digital toybox – Noisemakers: Build and keep your own synthesiser 

Meet the author Mirabelle Maslin talking about sharing stories and books with infants and children 

Minecraft Storylines  – an interactive story-writing workshop using minecraft to guide young writers to explore plot, character and dialogue and much more

Up! screening – More!fun festival presents a screening of Disney Pixar’s Up.

See the full programme.

Trainspotting at 20

This is Tim Bell. For the last ten years Tim has conducted Trainspotting tours of Leith, sharing insights on the book and the film with visitors from around the world.

TimTim probably knows more about Trainspotting than anyone (with the possible exception of Irvine Welsh!) and yesterday he came along to Central Library to talk about the film adaptation of the book, which premiered 20 years ago this month.

Tim began by putting Trainspotting in  a social and historical context, explaining the circumstances that led to the Sunday Telegraph describing Edinburgh in 1986 as “the AIDS capital of Europe”.

Then Tim moved on to the book itself and the ‘cultural fireball’ that it became.

Perhaps a film of the book was inevitable, although as Tim explained filmmakers Danny Boyle, John Hodge and Andrew MacDonald had previously forsworn adaptations, wanting instead to create original cinema.

We really enjoyed hearing Tim’s thoughts on the film’s plot, characters and particularly its music. Tim also took time to remind us on the impact the film had: how Trainspotting became a brand, and what that brand represented.

It was interesting to read contemporary reviews of the film as well: from Will Self’s description of it as ‘an extended pop video’ to Shelia Johnston’s feeling that ‘for all its brilliance, the film finally feels sour and hollow’.

Tim believes that Trainspotting ‘educates as effortlessly as it entertains’ – we could say the same about him.

Tim is in the late stages of writing his own book, provisionally titled Love Life, Love Leith: a Trainspotter’s Guide. To find out more visit www.leithwalks.co.uk 

Books on the big screen: forthcoming attractions

Looking forward to the film adaptations of Andy Weir’s ‘The Martian’ and Bill Bryson’s ‘A Walk in the Woods’, both of which come out next year.

Here’s a list of other books which have been made forthcoming movies – which ones will you be going to see?

Five remarkable stories for Autism Awareness Day

The reason I jump by Naoki Higishida

Written by Naoki Higishida when he was only 13, this incredible book explains the often baffling behaviour of autistic children and shows the way they think and feel – such as about the people around them, time and beauty, noise, and themselves. Naoki abundantly proves that autistic people do possess imagination, humour and empathy, but also makes clear, with great poignancy, how badly they need our compassion, patience and understanding.

Dear Miss Landau by James Christie

James Christie is a Scot with Apserger syndrome. Juliet Landau stars in Buffy the Vampire Slayer. This is the true story of their friendship.

Mary and Max

This claymation-animated movie starring the late Phillip Seymour Hoffman charts the correspondence between an eight-year-old girl living in the suburbs of Melbourne, with her alcoholic mother and inattentive father, and an obese 40-something Jewish New Yorker prone to panic attacks. The only thing the two have in common is their friendlessness and profound sense of alienation. Based on real events spanning continents and decades, this is a highly original, very funny and deeply moving piece of work.

A friend like Henry by Nuala Gardner

Determined that her autistic son, Dale, should live a fulfilling life, Nuala Gardner describes her despair after being repeatedly let down by the authorities. But their lives were transformed when they welcomed a golden retriever into the family and found that the bond between Dale and his dog helped him to produce the breakthrough they sought. There’s a sequel: All because of Henry

All cats have Asperger syndrome by Kathy Hoopmann

This book draws parallels between children with Asperger syndrome and the behaviour of cats, illustrating shared characteristics and evoking the difficulties and joys of raising a child who is different.

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