Bill Hall’s family story

Bill Hall is a keen family historian. Born in 1946, Bill has lived most of his life in Edinburgh. Over the past couple of years, he has shared with us, many photographs and material regarding his family and we’ve now compiled a lovely exhibition depicting his family story on Capital Collections.

Bill’s mother Mary was the custodian of the family archive and shared her memories with Bill. Born 1911, she lived in Albion Road, attending Albion Road School. During the summer she visited relatives in Ratho, Tranent and Cockenzie.

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Mary Clark Welsh

In our exhibition we meet several of Bill’s family. There’s Alexander Clark, Bill’s great-great-grandfather, who was born c1813 in Linlithgow and worked as a carter carrying stone. He gave this up to become a canal banksman moving to Wilkie’s Basin, near Ratho. A banksman’s job was to maintain the canal ensuring it was kept in good order. They dredged the canal and kept it clear of weeds and debris for the traffic that travelled along the canal.

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Banksmen at Ratho

Bill’s great-uncle Alexander Henderson, born in 1890, was employed by St Cuthbert’s Co-operative as an assistant grocer and played in their football team. It’s possible he joined a “pals battalion”, a group of men from the same workplace or football team who enlisted together. He joined the Seaforth Highlanders and after training landed in Boulogne in May 1915. He died at the Battle of Loos on 12th October 1915 aged 25.

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St Cuthbert’s Athletic FC

Bill’s father Joseph was born in 1911. A postcard shows Joseph aged about 3, taken on Christmas Eve 1914. A gift for his father William, who was off to the front, the message on the back reads, “Love to Daddy from Joe“. William died of wounds on 8th April 1916.

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Joseph Hall, Bill’s father

Another of Bill’s great uncles, Archie Tait had been a ploughman at Wilkie’s Basin in Ratho before joining Edinburgh City Police in 1914. He served with The Lovat Scouts Mounted Division during WW1. They saw service on the Western Front, at Gallipoli and in Egypt and Macedonia. Archie returned to Edinburgh City Police in 1919 as a mounted policeman and on his retirement from the police in 1945, worked as a doorman at Register House.

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Archie Tait

View the full exhibition of Bill Hall’s family story on Capital Collections.

Saughton Park Restoration Project

Rumours of the old house being haunted, romantic walks in the rose garden, dancing to music at the bandstand, catching fish in jam jars at the Water of Leith… these are just some of the colourful memories recorded so far as part of the Saughton Park Restoration Project.

Since summer 2016 Edinburgh charity the Living Memory Association has been working with volunteers to uncover the social history of the park and the surrounding area.
The material will help shape the park, for example in new artwork and information panels, and be archived for the benefit of future generations.

The Edinburgh and Scottish Collection are hosting an exhibition where you can enjoy a taste of the memories, images and documents collected so far, and read about the plans for the restoration project.

Saughton – the People’s Park is in the Edinburgh and Scottish Collection until March 31st 2017.

bandstand-and-art-galleriesDiscover more about Saughton Park’s past by reading our previous blog post on Saughton’s Glorious Summer of 1908.

 

Wester Hailes Library presents: A kind of seeing

Wester Hailes Library is holding a unique archive film and photography event on Wednesday 22 February, 6 – 7.30pm, focusing on the history of the local community.

Children playing, Wester Hailes Drive

The main event will be a specially curated archive film screening, which will be shown on the library’s new cinema-size screen, complete with surround-sound! Films included in the programme will explore themes of community, through both films about the local area and Scotland as a whole, including…

WEALTH OF A NATION (1978, 17 min) – Made as part of a group of 7 documentaries for the 1938 Empire Exhibition, under the supervision of John Grierson. The film compares the old and new industries in Scotland, from shipyards to local farms.

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EDINBURGH SAYS FAREWELL TO ITS TRAMS (1956, 5 min) – A series of shots over the last couple of days before the original Edinburgh tram service closed.

HUTS – A FILM FROM WESTER HAILES (1985, 20 min extract) – A film following the efforts of local Wester Hailes residents working together to improve life locally through the building and development of ‘The Huts’ as community facilities.

The screenings will be followed by a short discussion about the films, and the history of the local area. Everyone’s welcome to join in the discussion, and stay to enjoy some refreshments (tea, coffee & biscuits).

Alongside the film screening, there will be a photo exhibition of images taken around the local community. The exhibition will consist of both printed photographs and laptops connected to online archives, such as Capital Collections and Edinburgh Collected. While most of the printed photographs will come from the library’s own collection, we’d welcome any additions, so if you have any interesting photos of the local area, please get in touch.

The event is free to attend. Limited tickets are available online from Eventbrite.

Tickets are also available direct from Wester Hailes Library: email westerhailes.library@edinburgh.gov.uk, phone us on 0131 529 5667, or drop in and speak to a member of staff.

“Wester Hailes library presents: A kind of seeing” is funded by Film Hub Scotland and is part of projects being piloted in Scotland under the Film Education in Libraries Project. The £190,000 initiative was made possible through Creative Scotland as part of their Film Strategy and aims to improve the provision of film and moving image education across the country.  This screening was commissioned by Scottish Library and Information Council (SLIC).

Read all about it – 200 years old today!

Today marks the 200th anniversary of the The Scotsman. When it first appeared, it was a weekly newspaper with daily editions appearing in 1850.

Unlike today there were no headlines shouting out for attention, indeed the front page of the first edition laid out what the paper hoped to achieve. It begged to observe “that we have not chosen the name Scotsman to preserve an invidious distinction, but with a view of rescuing it from the odium of servility”.

Front page of The Scotsman 25th January 1817

Front page of The Scotsman 25th January 1817

The paper contained no photographs or illustrations just printed text with news from around the world. It did feature Births, Deaths and Marriages together with the market prices from the Edinburgh Corn Market and Meat Market where we know that “there were 985 sheep in the Grassmarket on Wednesday morning which sold well”.

In 1817 the price of the weekly Scotsman was 10d nowadays you can read it for FREE by downloading our Pressreader  App.

Or why not search our Scotsman Digital Archive and discover more stories from Scotland’s past?

 

Bobby visits Central Library

We celebrated the life and times of Greyfriars Bobby by inviting champion Skye Terrier Hanna and her pup Murren to the library to meet with a group of schoolchildren from Abbeyhill Primary School.

At Central Library

Moira and Katie with their Skye Terriers Hanna and Murren at Central Library

Hanna’s owner Moira shared her lifelong fascination with this legendary Edinburgh story and her dedication to the now rare Skye Terrier breed.  Moira’s granddaughter Katie took charge of the pup, but like many youngsters Murren was too fidgety for a photo shoot at the famous statue. But well done to Hanna for staying put, and we were glad that no one rubbed her nose!

Hanna and Bobby

Hanna and Bobby

Holocaust Memorial Day 2017: How can life go on?

Holocaust Memorial DayOn 27 January we mark Holocaust Memorial Day. We remember not only the millions killed in the Holocaust under Nazi persecution, but also those who have been victims of subsequent genocides. We honour the survivors and reflect upon the lessons of their experiences to challenge hatred and persecution and to prevent future atrocities.
This year’s Holocaust Memorial Day asks the question `How can life go on?’, asking us to consider what happens after a genocide.

From Wednesday 11 – Saturday 28 January a display from library collections on the Mezzanine floor, Central Library, considers the creative response to the Holocaust and the contribution that peoples of Jewish origin have made to the cultures of the countries that they were displaced to. We explore how suffering can be channelled and expressed through art, music and writing through pieces reflecting on the Holocaust and how artists, musicians and writers emerged from their experiences, demonstrating how life can go on.

At Central Library on Friday 27 January, 2 – 3pm,  Dr Hannah Holtschneider from the University of Edinburgh is delivering a talk entitled `Holocaust Memorial Day – `How can life go on? The long way home’, reflecting on the aftermath of the Holocaust for refugees and survivors who came to Scotland.

Edinburgh’s Modern Architecture

Yesterday we blogged about Edinburgh’s historic architecture – the world-renowned architecture of its Medieval Old Town and Georgian New Town. But what of the city’s buildings and developments over the past 70 years – its so-called Post-war Architecture?

Our next Capital Collections exhibition examines Modern Architecture in Edinburgh. During the latter part of the 20th century, construction took place across Scotland on new homes, schools, tower blocks, roads, churches and in some cases, even whole new towns. There was a commitment to improve public health and tackle poor housing. After the austerity of the 1940s and 50s, new technologies and materials combined in a period of reconstruction.

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The pictures within the exhibition highlight buildings in Edinburgh constructed since 1945 that have been recognised as architecturally significant and in many instances, are statutory listed as having special architectural or historic interest. Modern architecture can be a contentious topic, loved and loathed by both critics and the public. However, the buildings here show structures representative of their time and architectural styles; buildings that perhaps haven’t been around long enough yet for their value to be appreciated by all…?