Your Library online

As well as your local branch library there’s one more branch that you should that get to know really well – Your Library, our online branch.

It’s your one-stop-shop for managing your library account, finding out about our books and accessing a range of brilliant online resources.

Go to Your Library at https://yourlibrary.edinburgh.gov.uk to:

1. Access your Library Account  to check what books you’ve got out; renew your books; see your wish list; reserve a book

2. Search the Library Catalogue

3. Find out about Library Events and what’s going on in your local branch

4. Get helpful instructions of how to use our downloadable ebook, audiobook, newspaper and magazine services

5. Suggest a book to be added to stock

6. Find lists of recently added books

7. Start your family or local history search

8. Find information about all our branches

9. See our full A-Z list of all our online resources

 

 

 

 

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Big Library Read – digital book club

What Happened to Lizzie Lovett?  That’s the mystery that you can unravel by participating in the world’s largest digital reading club Big Library Read! The book this time is Chelsea Sedoti’s young adult debut novel, The Hundred Lies of Lizzie Lovett, and unlimited people will be able to read it from our OverDrive site at the same time from 12th till 26th October. Not only will the ebook be available, but also the audiobook so you can choose whatever format you fancy.

Told with a unique voice that is both hilarious and heart-wrenching, Sedoti challenges readers to distinguish the line between reality and fiction. Popular girl Lizzie Lovett’s disappearance is the one fascinating mystery her sleepy town has ever had. Classmate and teenage misfit, Hawthorn Creely has her own theory for Lizzie’s disappearance. And what better way to collect evidence than to immerse herself in Lizzie’s life? Like getting a job at the diner where Lizzie worked and hanging out with Lizzie’s boyfriend. After all, it’s not as if he killed her-or did he?

Author Chelsea Sedoti says “The protagonist of The Hundred Lies of Lizzie Lovett is no stranger to reading; she knows all about using books as an escape. Seventeen-year-old misfit Hawthorn Creely is dissatisfied with the real world. She’d rather lose herself in fiction, where everything is bigger, better, and more magical. But when Hawthorn applies this mindset to the disappearance of her former classmate, Lizzie Lovett, life goes awry.”

Readers can join an online conversation about the book at BigLibraryRead.com. All you need is library membership so you can login with your library card and PIN. Full instructions for using OverDrive can be found on our Your Library website.

 

Read all about it!

Did you know you can read over 4000 UK and worldwide newspapers and magazines for free on your tablet, phone or computer? From anywhere you can simply login to the  PressReader  app or website with your library card number and PIN to get access to today’s news 24/7.

With Edinburgh Libraries PressReader service you can access over 100 UK and Irish newspapers including today’s editions of the Edinburgh Evening NewsScotsmanScottish Daily MailThe Press and JournalThe Guardian and The Herald as well as over 100 UK magazines.

Publications from over 100 countries in 60 languages are available including from Poland, India, USA, France and China. Articles can be translated into 16 languages and you can also listen to today’s news by using Library PressReader’s Radio function which will read articles out to you.

PressReader has a small range of material for children too as it includes comics such as the BeanoHorrible Histories and Doctor Who Adventures. It also includes a newspaper aimed specifically at children – First News.

You’ll find full user instructions on our Your Library website.

Magazine madness

Well, you’d be mad not to use our magazine service. There’s no catch, just instant access to over 130 popular magazine titles for you to download and keep. It has an easy to use app and best of all its free.

So make good use your library card today and use RBdigital to get free digital access to magazines such as Hello!, New Scientist, Grazia, Amateur Photographer, Good Housekeeping and BBC Good Food.

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RBdigital is really easy to set up, works brilliantly (especially on tablets) and could of course save you a fortune in magazine subscriptions. Head over to our RBdigital page to see the full list of titles and find out how to get started.

Enjoy!

Listen up!

Love audiobooks? Whats not to love! – they are ideal for the morning commute, the gym or while you’re doing the cooking, housework and DIY. Edinburgh Libraries has a fantastic selection of audiobooks for you to enjoy. Did you know you could download hundreds for free at home from Edinburgh Libraries? We have four different downloadable audiobook suppliers so we can give you the widest choice possible of authors and publishers.

Check these out today –

OverDrive – checkout over 1500 adult, teen and child audiobooks with OverDrive. You can borrow up to 10 at a time and either stream over the internet or download on your mobile device or computer.

RBdigital – has a great range of bestselling British authors such as Peter May, Cecelia Ahern, Val McDermid, Peter James, David Walliams and Santa Montefiore. Borrow another 5 titles here with automatic returns and no fines. 1500 titles to choose from including children’s, teen and adult titles.

Borrowbox – has a super easy to use app and a growing collection of over 400 adult audiobooks. Some fantastic titles including The Muse by Jessie Burton, The Widow by Fiona Barton and My Italian Bulldozer by Alexander McCall Smith.

uLIBRARY – our newest service with a growing choice of British authors including Ann Cleeves, Quintin Jardine, Paula Hawkins, M.J.Arlidge & Katie Fforde

 

Why we love ebooks!

Here are some reasons why OverDrive, our ebook serviceis so popular with our library members:

1. eBooks are portable

One of the most frequently trumpeted advantage of ebooks is that they are more portable than printed books. Perfect for travelling and commuting.

 

2. eBooks offer more choice to people who have problems with their vision

Lots of people who borrow ebooks do so because they have sight problems that prevent them from being able to read your average paperback. OverDrive has made a real difference to their reading life as you can alter fonts and background colours.

3. eBooks offer more choice 

The 10 ebooks you can borrow for three weeks comes on top of the 12 item limit for physical books. That’s 22 books every three weeks – more than enough reading for anyone (surely?!).

4. eBooks mean you’re never far from the library

Whether you’re holidaying in Troon or Tenerife, or stuck in the doctor’s waiting room as long as you’ve got internet access you’ve got the library with you. You can return and borrow books to your heart’s content!

5. Nobody needs to know what you’re reading

And we’re not just talking about keeping your Fifty Shades of Grey addiction a secret from your fellow bus passengers. OverDrive offers free access to lots of self-help books covering sensitive issues that many readers would rather not broadcast to people around them.

That’s five reasons, can you think of any others?

 

The people who helped shape Edinburgh Libraries: Andrew Carnegie

As the teenage son of an unemployed Scottish Weaver in Pittsburgh, Andrew Carnegie understood the value of libraries. Not able to go into his local library because it charged a subscription fee, he and other children from the factory where he worked were offered the chance to use a local merchant’s personal library, where he imbibed knowledge which would later help to make him one of the richest men who ever lived, and the embodiment of The American Dream.

As an adult he would become a steel tycoon, building a huge company which he sold to JP Morgan for $480 million dollars (in 1901 this was the biggest business transaction to have ever taken place). Carnegie didn’t want his money for himself however, instead sowing seeds for future learning, so all children, regardless of their income, would have access to books and the infinite knowledge that they held.

“A Library outranks any one other thing a community can do to benefit its people,” he said, “It is a never failing spring in the desert.”

Carnegie’s trust built libraries across America and the UK, as well as three in European cities devastated by World War 1; but his first library was built in Dunfermline, his birth place. The motto – ‘Let There be Light’ –  is now familiar to borrowers and staff at Edinburgh’s Central Library, where the logo also appears, a reminder of the importance of libraries and what they offer.

Andrew Carnegie laying the foundation stone of the Edinburgh Free Library, 1887

Edinburgh Central Library opened in 1890, and was the first public library in the city. The building was designed by George Washington Browne and is built from Stirlingshire stone. 1428 books were issued on the first day, and 44,774 people registered as readers in the first year alone.

A bust of Andrew Carnegie keeps watch over his collection.

Read all the articles in this series of ‘The people who helped shape Edinburgh Libraries’:

George Washington Browne: architect

Robert Butchart: City Librarian

Henry Dyer, engineer, educationist and Japanophile

William McEwan: brewer and philanthropist

David Mather Masson: scholar and biographer

Thomas Ross: architect and antiquarian

Charles Boog Watson: local historian and antiquarian