Art Library exhibition for December 2017

The Art and Design Library’s new exhibition ‘Inscape’, is a joint exhibition by three artists, Frieda Dyson, Fiona McLachlan Powell and Clive McLachlan Powell

Here we hand over to the artists to tell us about their work.

Frieda Dyson writes:

`Born in Glasgow, and with a background which is half Hebridean, water in all its moods, has always featured large in my work. I have painted roaring water in the Western Isles, and calm, building reflected water in Cambridge, where I lived for many years, but it is always a challenge. Watercolour, acrylics, oils and dry pastels all have their different difficulties. Recently, trees have figured in my work since I have been spending time in Edinburgh’s wonderful Botanic Gardens. My work is in various collections in the UK and, also Australia, New Zealand, Cyprus and the USA.’

 

Fiona McLachlan Powell writes:

`My work explores thresholds through my experience of mental health and also in the contexts of philosophy and culture. Sometimes the materials I use are domestic or tied in with labour. I grew up in a farmworking family near Duns in the Scottish borders. The rhythm to the days and seasons in that life and its improvisations influence my work and my way of working.  The hessian my shepherd grandfather used as a kirtle to protect him from the rain, transcends its initial use.

Working in the disciplines of sculpture, photography, film, drawing and installation I like to create a sense of journey through liminal space and approaching thresholds. I explore thresholds through process and through experimenting with various materials that spoke to me in the past and that I respond to now.

I have come to a way of creating sculptural work that can be dismantled then reconstructed, and reconfigured. I place my work in different environments; in woodland or architectural spaces for dialogue, each location transforms the work’.

 

Clive McLachlan Powell writes

`My work lies between sound, form and place; bringing transforming elements of materials, sound and gesture into space to explore the liminal. This transformation reflects a somatic experience, the feeling of sound beyond what is heard through the ears alone. Ways of making include creative foraging, casting as a way of transforming materiality, drawing with objects, photography and film. Other methods include singing of archaic songs, using my skull as an aeolian resonator, and placing contemporary sound composition alongside collaborative improvisation with dancers. I like to feel the spaces where I work – art spaces, nature, dance clubs become welcoming, finding still points in sounding and moving forms alongside the sonorous’.

Come and see this fantastic new exhibition of art work on show in the Art and Design Library from 2 to 29 December.

Advertisements

Sketching the city

We were delighted when Sketchnthecity allowed the Central Library to exhibit a large-scale sketch of Edinburgh. The sketch is the 3rd in the ‘69 cities’ project to sketch all 69 cities across the UK.

Artist Carl Lavia says: “Each artwork is a celebration for the people who live, work and simply love the city”.

Artist Carl Lavia at work on a large-scale Edinburgh cityscape sketch

And now, we’re thrilled to report that the Sketchnthecity project partnership of Carl ‘Sketch’ Lavia and photographer Lorna Le Bredonchel have kindly allowed us to share images of the amazing Edinburgh sketch on Capital Collections.

We thought we’d take the opportunity to delve into our collections and uncover how artists have captured views of the city through the years. So our latest exhibition on Capital Collections, entitled Sketching the City, showcases views of the awesome Sketchnthecity drawing alongside historical sketches from our archives.

Click to zoom into the incredible detailed drawing!

Remember, you can visit the phenomenal Sketchnthecity drawing of Edinburgh’s city centre at Central Library until the end of September 2018.

Art & cookery – from Syria and other countries to Edinburgh

An exhibition opens 4 November on the Central Library Staircase, running until 29 displaying art work from an art and cookery project organised by City of Edinburgh Council Lifelong Learning, uniting adult education students from various countries  – Australia, New Zealand, Spain, Germany, Scotland – including Syrian and Syrian Kurdish families (refugees) who had only been recently, resettled to Edinburgh.

Sharing favourite foods, cooking techniques and recipes made the group come together very easily, supported by two experienced Italian chefs /adult education tutors.

Artists and adult education tutors Susie Wilson and Justine Woycicka led the art work of the project. Using various different techniques of drawing and printmaking, the students made images inspired by both their experiences of cooking, and the stories connected to these recipes.

Students learnt how to make a book structure to keep their favourite recipes and incorporate their images and words into the pages and covers. Each student could contribute to a collaborative recipe book as well as making a smaller book for themselves.

The project was funded and part of Trans-nationalising Modern Languages: Mobility Identity and Translation in Modern Italian Cultures: a 3 year project funded by the Art and Humanities Research Council and involved researchers at St Andrews, Queen Margaret, Bristol, Cardiff and Warwick Universities.

Edinburgh Zine Library opening in Art & Design Library

Come to the opening of the Edinburgh Zine Library (E.Z.L) on Wednesday 1st November. Established in August 2017 and located in the Art & Design Library, the E.Z.L is a collectively run reference library of contemporary zines.

Don’t know what a zine is? Come along to find out more, and why it’s important to collect and catalogue them!

The event runs from 4 – 7.30pm and you can drop in anytime. There’ll be zine making workshops (materials provided) as well as some short talks, a zine swap, space to browse the collection and chat to E.Z.L members and the opportunity to contribute a page to E.Z.L’s first collaboratively made zine!  Oh and cake! Lots of cake!

Practical stuff: The Art & Design Library is not wheelchair accessible and there is no level access – using the lift there is an additional twenty steps. There will be an area downstairs which is level access and where there will be a stall, seats, zines and members of E.Z.L to chat. Get in touch for more information at edinburghzinelibrary@gmail.com. Kids are welcome, however they require the supervision of a parent or guardian!

Find E.Z.L on social media for more info:
Insta: @edinburghzinelibrary
Twitter: @edzinelibrary
Facebook: @edinburghzinelibrary
www.edinburghzinelibrary.WordPress.com

Art and Design Library exhibition October

The Art and Design Library‘s October exhibition is entitled Works on Paper. From the 9th-30th October you’ll be able to see a series of watercolour paintings created by artist Eva Mitera, graduate of the University of Edinburgh, participant of the X Florence Biennale and curated by Dr Shih Mei Lee.

Eva works in both oils and watercolours, creating paintings focused on the themes of  natural and meteorological phenomena, landscape and images alternately abstract and realistic. This exhibition however focuses on Eva’s watercolours, which are on a smaller scale than her oil paintings, but are independent pieces in their own right, not studies for her larger works.

Eva enjoys the process of creating watercolours, especially the unpredictability of the result. She allows the colours to blend across the paper to emphasize rich bright hues and brush stokes. In her experiments with this medium she has also added dry pastel, crayons and ink to achieve impressions of reality or imaginary landscapes. Her works present a sensation of radiant energy and controlled frenzy.

 

 

 

The people who helped shape Edinburgh Libraries: Robert Butchart

Robert Butchart held the post of Edinburgh City Librarian from 1942 until 1953. Mr Butchart had a particular interest in topographical prints of Old Edinburgh, and collected drawings by the likes of Bruce J. Home and engravings by John Ewbank. After Mr Butchart retired, he published a book in 1955 entitled, ‘Prints and Drawings of Edinburgh’, giving ‘A descriptive account of the collection in the Edinburgh Room of the Central Public Library’. Mr Butchart wrote with pride of the collection of prints and drawings held by the then Edinburgh Room which had been accumulated over the previous 25 years, claiming it ‘undoubtedly ranks as the finest collection in existence of topographical and historical prints of the City’.

In October 1982, Mr Butchart’s personal collection was presented to the Central Library by his daughter, Miss Jean Butchart. In this short film, she explains why she felt it appropriate that the majority of the prints from her father’s collection should be housed in the library where he had first become inspired by the subject.

The prints collection of the Edinburgh and Scottish Collection at Central Library has continued to grow since Mr Butchart’s tenure and you can now search many more hundreds of stunning images of Edinburgh from our collections on Capital Collections.

Read all the articles in this series of ‘The people who helped shape Edinburgh Libraries’:

George Washington Browne: architect

Andrew Carnegie: steelmaker and philanthropist

Henry Dyer, engineer, educationist and Japanophile

William McEwan: brewer and philanthropist

David Mather Masson: scholar and biographer

Thomas Ross: architect and antiquarian

Charles Boog Watson: local historian and antiquarian

The people who helped shape Edinburgh Libraries: Henry Dyer

Over the years, a number of individuals have helped shape Edinburgh City Libraries and our collections. In a series of posts, we’ll throw the spotlight on a few of these influential figures from our past and describe how their philanthropy helped our library collections evolve and grow in significance.
The Five Festivals - Spring FestivalWe start our series with arguably our most significant benefactor: Henry Dyer, engineer, educationist and Japanophile.

Henry Dyer was born in 1848 in the parish of Bothwell, Lanarkshire. In 1857 the family moved to Shotts where he received most of his schooling. From 1865 he was employed as an apprentice at James Aitken and Company’s foundry in Cranstonhill, Glasgow and while there he also attended classes at Anderson’s College (later Strathclyde University). He graduated from Glasgow University in 1873 with a degree in engineering. On the recommendation of his professor he was invited to become the Principal of the new Imperial College of Engineering in Tokyo in 1873.

Greatly esteemed by the Japanese, his teaching methods were credited with assisting in the rapid industrialisation of Japan and in 1882 he was awarded the Order of the Rising Sun (Third Class). Dyer returned to Scotland in 1882 bringing with him numerous art works and instruments. In Glasgow he continued to make a valuable contribution to engineering education and was awarded both an honorary DSc and LLD from the University of Glasgow.

Henry Dyer died on 25 September, 1918 at his home in Glasgow. After his death a substantial bequest was given to the Mitchell Library, Glasgow, which included papers relating to his roles as engineer and educator. It also included Japanese artworks and artefacts. He donated musical instruments to Glasgow Museums. In 1945 and 1955 Edinburgh City Libraries received two donations via his daughter Marie Ferguson Dyer.

336The Edinburgh City Libraries bequest consists of 50 loose Japanese woodblock prints, a number of bound woodblock printed volumes, painted scrolls and a collection of nineteenth century Japanese photographs, attributed to Baron Raimund von Stillfried. Much of the Dyer Collection is available to browse on Capital Collections (www.capitalcollections.org.uk) including several online exhibitions:

Get in touch if you’re interested to come into Central Library and see items from the Dyer Collection or any other material from our Special Collections. If you have archival material related to Edinburgh, Scotland or Scots abroad, and would like to help our collections continue to grow, contact eclis@edinburgh.gov.uk .

Read all the articles in this series of ‘The people who helped shape Edinburgh Libraries’:

George Washington Browne: architect

Robert Butchart: City Librarian

Andrew Carnegie: steelmaker and philanthropist

William McEwan: brewer and philanthropist

David Mather Masson: scholar and biographer

Thomas Ross: architect and antiquarian

Charles Boog Watson: local historian and antiquarian