Found in Translation

Today, we hand the blog over to Cecylia from the Edinburgh and Scottish Collection to tell us about Central Library’s Found in Translation book group:

The Found in Translation book group meets in Central library every first Monday of the month and we read and discuss English translations of fiction from around the world. Every book takes us on a literary and cultural journey to a different country. We are a diverse group spanning many nationalities, backgrounds and careers. We come from different parts of Europe: Bulgaria, Italy, Poland, Scotland and Ireland.

This year we were chosen to shadow the Man Booker International Prize. This prize is given annually to a book which is translated into English and published in the UK. We were asked to read the shortlisted title, ‘Compass’ by Mathias Enard, review it and join in the online conversation about the book and the prize on Twitter and Facebook. 

 

We have absolutely loved the whole experience – from the excitement of being picked by the Reading Agency as a shadowing group, to reading beautiful and challenging  ‘Compass’, sharing our thoughts online and finally discussing it as a group during our monthly meeting. Read our reviews to see what we thought of ‘Compass’.

We have gained so much from reading books from many languages and cultures and we’d encourage readers to get out of their reading comfort zones and join us.

The winner was announced last week and the prize went to A Horse Walks Into a Bar by David Grossman and translated by Jessica Cohen. Read this and the other Man Booker International 2017 longlist from Your Library.

 

Explorers at the Library: Edinburgh Art Festival families programme

This year the Edinburgh Art Festival’s Explorers families programme comes to Central Library for free weekly creative art making sessions suitable for ages 8-13. These sessions are inspired by the EAF artist commissions programme and the ‘Making of the Future’ theme. Join us weekly or drop in for a one-off session to creatively re-imagine your city.

“Tower” by Toby Patterson, Dunfermline 2014

Each session will look at a different artist and include 2D and 3D arts activities such as building a miniature bothy inspired by artist Bobby Niven, designing a modernist city after artist Toby Paterson and creating inflatable giant flower sculptures inspired by artist duo Walker and Bromwich.

All sessions will be held in the George Washington Room within the Central Library

Thu 6 July 2-4pm
Explorers at the Library: Walker and Bromwich
Create your own inflatable sculptures and model dragons inspired by Walker and Bromwich’s Dragon of Profit and Private Ownership.

Thu 13 July 2-4pm
Explorers at the Library: Bobby Niven
Design and build your own miniature bothys and dens inspired by Bobby Niven’s Palmhouse.

Thu 20 July 2-4pm
Explorers at the Library: Shannan Te Ao
Make musical instruments and write your own musical score inspired by Shannan Te Ao’s use of Maori songs and proverbs.

Thu 3 August 2-4pm
Explorers at the Library: Toby Paterson
Make your own 3D collage of a fantasy building, drawing on Paterson’s modernist architectural influences.

Thu 10 August 2-4pm
Explorers at the Library: The Making of the Future
Design and build a miniature installation in the library, of a future Edinburgh city centre inspired by the “grandfather of town planning”, Patrick Geddes.

In celebration of the children’s work the outcomes of each workshop will be exhibited in the Children’s Library for the last week of the festival, 21-27 August.

These sessions are free and all materials are included. Booking is recommended, but not essential. To book call  0131 242 8040 or visit www.edinburghreads.eventbrite.co.uk

Yarn Bombing Ratho

Ratho residents awoke to a colourful sight last week, as the village was transformed into a woolly wonderland! Ratho Library’s guerrilla knitters have been secretly working hard for the last few months on woollen lengths of many patterns, and have created hundreds of brightly coloured pom poms.

Photograph of Yarn bomb

Ratho Yarn Bombs

The Ratho Library knitting group were helped by knitters at Sighthill Library and by many other members of the community, eventually producing enough material to create cosy trees, decorate the fences and plant a field of pom poms! Children from the village helped with the decoration, and local teenagers have agreed to keep an eye on the knitted creations, so that the efforts of our knitters can be seen by all. Ratho Gala Day, which was on Saturday 10th June, is a day where Ratho residents celebrate the fantastic spirit of community that exists in their village, and through the yarn bombing efforts, our library borrowers have played their part in ensuring that Ratho is looking it’s best for this special day.

Library competition for Rebus30

1987 was a huge year for readers everywhere. It was the year that John Rebus first sprang to life on the page of Ian Rankin’s novel Knots and Crosses. Smoking and drinking too much and firmly his own man, he was already the dedicated, irrepressible, canny detective we all love today.

Photograph of Ian Rankin

Ian Rankin

Thirty years later, John Rebus is one of the best loved detectives out there, still working cases in Edinburgh and still as alive on the page as ever. The new Rebus story Rather be the Devil is out now in paperback.

Rebus Fest is your chance to celebrate Rebus, and enjoy the music, art, writing and yes, booze, that has both inspired, and been inspired by, the iconic detective. Rebus Fest events will be held across Edinburgh from 30 June to 2 July 2017. Find out more and buy tickets here http://www.ianrankin.net/rebusfest.

 

Tickets are selling fast, with some events already sold out, so we have a library competition for you to win the chance to sample the very essence of Rebus.

Take part to win a pair of tickets to an exclusive Highland Park WhiskyTasting on Saturday 1 July at 1.30  at the Caledonian Hotel, a well-known Edinburgh (and Rebus) landmark). Hosted by Martin Markvardsen, the brand’s Senior Brand Ambassador, he will walk you through why Highland Park stands apart from other single malt Scotch whiskies and why Rebus is a fan. The tasting will include 4 special Highland Park whiskies including Highland Park Rebus30, 10 Year Old.

The winner, along with five lucky runners up will receive a paperback copy of the new Rebus novel Rather be the Devil.

Book cover

To enter the competition simply tell us –  In which Scottish city does John Rebus live and work ?
1. Glasgow
2. Aberdeen
3. Edinburgh

Email you entry to informationdigital@edinburgh.gov.uk by 12 noon on 23 June.

You can catch up with some of John Rebus’s earlier cases in this library selection of the best of Edinburgh crime fiction

The Other Einstein

The titles we get for our OverDrive Big Library Read club just keep getting better and better! Hot on the heels of the brilliant DC Daley (our May ebook read) we now meet an amazing woman in the form of Mileva Marić, the woman behind one of the most famous men of the twentieth century, Albert Einstein.

The Other Einstein by Marie Benedict offers a window into the fascinating story of Einstein’s first wife. A brilliant physicist in her own right, her contribution to the special theory of relativity is hotly debated and may have been inspired by her own profound and very personal insight. This historical fiction book, offers readers a window into a brilliant woman whose light was lost in Einstein’s enormous shadow.

Albert Einstein and Mileva Maric, 1912

“The moment I first learned about Mileva, I discovered that she was fascinating in her own right and I felt compelled to tell her tale,” said Marie Benedict, author of The Other Einstein. “The more I researched Mileva and came to know her through her letters, I realized that her story was powerful and important in itself, and instrumental in understanding our own history and the role of women in it.”

This Big Library Read will be available on our OverDrive site with unlimited downloads from the 12 – 26 June. All you need is a library card to take part. So if you are going away on holiday, this is the first thing to download and put in your suitcase! Why not encourage friends and family to read it too, it’s the perfect excuse to get together and have your own book group. Or join in online with the conversation about the book at BigLibraryRead.com.

 

 

sun water oil silver

The Art Library exhibition for June is sun water oil silver by Charly Murray & Javier Ternero.

Charly Murray is Scottish and a painter with a background in book design.

Javier Ternero is a self-taught photographer who aged sixteen, began printing old family negatives found at home, back in Seville, Spain.

Both Charly and Javier have workshops in Leith’s Coburg House a converted Victorian grain warehouse with studios for over 80 artists. For this exhibition, Javier has looked at Scottish landscape and buildings that lend themselves to Victorian printing processes. Charly has concentrated on the plants that grow nearby these buildings to create cyanotypes. Both regulars of the Art and Design library, they find it an invaluable source of information and pleasure. Visit the exhibition and discover the treasure trove of the Art Library for yourself.

sun water oil silver runs from 2 – 29 June 2017.

 

 

 

 

In the Ink Dark

a dance and poem
made from memory and from conversation

In the Ink Dark is a new project from artist Luke Pell and collaborators. Throughout May and June a series of conversations and encounters with different people in Leith and Edinburgh will lead to a week of live dance performances at unique spaces across the city including Central Library and McDonald Road Library.

Performed by an eclectic group of dance and performance artists with an original music composition from Scott Twynholm, In the Ink Dark collects and explores experiences of loss and landscape, memory and materiality through dance, design and poetry.

Luke draws upon his own and others stories to make objects, dances and installations that can only exist because of different people coming together to listen and to share. This project invites people from all walks of life to talk with him, to share, reflect and celebrate something they have loved and lost. In the Ink Dark is an immersive project with different moments and modes of participation, an accumulative poem and choreography – for live and virtual space – that can only be made by the many people it meets with.

Drawings and photographs will be made as part of every performance of In the Ink Dark. The performance is immersive with seating provided, lasting approximately 1 hour with no interval.

Performances take place at:
McDonald Road Library Monday 19 June at 6 – 7pm
Central Library Thursday 22 June at 7 – 8pm.

Book online via Edinburgh Reads on Eventbrite.

Visit the In the Ink Dark website to find out more about the project and further performances.