Magazines on PressReader

Usually it’s the newspapers on PressReader that get all the attention, but today its the magazines! Lots of new magazines have been added so now there are over 300 UK magazine titles available to download through the PressReader app or read online.

Scottish Interest

There is huge range of titles to choose from so whether you are into knitting, computing, cars or keeping chickens they’ll be something for you! To use the service just login with your library card number and PIN.

Music & Screen

Simply install the app on your Apple, Android or Windows device and you can download up to 20 magazines (or newspapers) a day. If you don’t have a tablet or smartphone, you can read unlimited titles on your computer.

Motoring

To find the UK magazines on PressReader, click on the UK button on the homepage and then on Publication Types and choose Magazines. You can then use the menu button (three vertical dots) to put the magazines in A-Z order, more popular or the most current.

Something for everyone

Need help getting started with PressReader? Then pop into our eResources Drop-in on Tuesdays from 2-3.30pm in the Central Library.

 

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Edinburgh Zine Library opening in Art & Design Library

Come to the opening of the Edinburgh Zine Library (E.Z.L) on Wednesday 1st November. Established in August 2017 and located in the Art & Design Library, the E.Z.L is a collectively run reference library of contemporary zines.

Don’t know what a zine is? Come along to find out more, and why it’s important to collect and catalogue them!

The event runs from 4 – 7.30pm and you can drop in anytime. There’ll be zine making workshops (materials provided) as well as some short talks, a zine swap, space to browse the collection and chat to E.Z.L members and the opportunity to contribute a page to E.Z.L’s first collaboratively made zine!  Oh and cake! Lots of cake!

Practical stuff: The Art & Design Library is not wheelchair accessible and there is no level access – using the lift there is an additional twenty steps. There will be an area downstairs which is level access and where there will be a stall, seats, zines and members of E.Z.L to chat. Get in touch for more information at edinburghzinelibrary@gmail.com. Kids are welcome, however they require the supervision of a parent or guardian!

Find E.Z.L on social media for more info:
Insta: @edinburghzinelibrary
Twitter: @edzinelibrary
Facebook: @edinburghzinelibrary
www.edinburghzinelibrary.WordPress.com

Summer listening for teens

Are you a teenager? Like listening to audiobooks? Well the SYNC program is just what you need to make your summer sound good!

Visit the SYNC website and you’ll find two free audiobooks to download every week over the summer. Just visit the site every Thursday to see the new titles that are available. Install the OverDrive app on your phone or tablet and you can download the audiobooks straight to the app.

There’s a great range of titles from horror to romance to non-fiction with a bit of Terry Pratchett thrown in for good luck. I for one can’t wait to find out what exactly is “The Dorito Effect”!

The SYNC Program is available until the 17th August, but audiobooks for teens are available at any time from our OverDrive and OneClickdigital services.

Together We Read!

Edinburgh Libraries are taking part in Together We Reada digital book club, being run by participating UK libraries from 11–25 May 2017. The club connects readers by them reading the same ebook in OverDrive, at the same time. Once you begin reading, you can connect with other readers and join the conversation on the discussion board.

We are delighted that the first Together We Read title is a Scottish crime novel by a Scottish author – Whisky from Small Glasses by Denzil Meyrick. The book centres on DCI Jim Daley, who is sent to investigate a murder after the body of a woman is washed up on an idyllic beach on the West Coast of Scotland. Far away from urban resources, he finds himself a stranger in a close-knit community. Love, betrayal, fear and death stalk the small town, as Daley investigates a case that becomes more deadly than he could possibly imagine.

There will be no waiting lists and no holds for this ebook – simply download the book via the OverDrive app or start reading in your browser. Find full instructions on how to use OverDrive on our Your Library website.

Check out the Together We Read site to see an interview by the author; to download a discussion sheet for hosting your own book group or to join in with the chat about the book on the discussion board.

Love the book? Then read the rest of the books in the DCI Jim Daley series on OverDrive. If you’d rather have the audiobook versions you can find the first few titles on BorrowBox another of our audiobook services.

The art of chromolithography!

The Central Library often takes interns or student placements who use our special collections as a focus for their studies. One such student is Becky Sparagowski who completed a project with us as part of her Masters coursework at the Centre for the History of the Book, Edinburgh University.

Becky’s area of interest was “The chromolithographed decorative design books of the Art & Design Library” and in this blog post she explains exactly what chromolithography is!

Becky selecting her research material

Have you ever thought about colour printing? It’s something that’s fairly commonplace now, but when it was first introduced it was revolutionary.

One of the first people to get colour printing – or chromolithography – right was Owen Jones, who is most famous for his design book The Grammar of Ornament (1856). This book set a high bar for chromolithography, and all the books that were published after it tried to meet that standard. While Jones did much work in ornamental design (he was an architect by profession), he is best remembered for his work in chromolithography and the dedication with which he improved the colour printing process.

After Jones’s work, though, colour printing took off, and artists all across

Chromolithograph “Cacatoës et magnolia, bordure. Souris blanches” from L’animal dans la decoration (The animal in decoration) by Maurice Pillard Verneuil & E. Lévy, 1897.

Europe used the medium to produce artistic prints, posters, and, of course, art and design books. The late 19th and early 20th centuries produced a huge number of books with chromolithographic prints, many of which are very intricate and complicated. The work done in these books is even more impressive when you know that in chromolithography, the colours are printed one at a time, making the detailed work in these books incredibly difficult to do!

Chromolithograph “Moresque no.1” from Grammar of Ornament by Owen Jones, 1856

I recently sat down with the Art and Design Library’s wonderful collection of books with chromolithographic printing while working on a research project my MSc course in Book History and Material Culture at the University of Edinburgh. This collection of books – including The Grammar of Ornament – embodies everything that is noteworthy about chromolithography, from the detailed craftsmanship that goes into creating chromolithographic prints to the realisation of Victorian cultural values in the works themselves. They truly are an important – and beautiful – part of the history of the book.

The books can be consulted by contacting the Art & Design Library and you can explore some of Owen Jones’ beautiful prints in our online exhibition, Travel to Perfection: Owen Jones and The Alhambra on Capital Collections.

Holocaust Memorial Day 2017: How can life go on?

Holocaust Memorial DayOn 27 January we mark Holocaust Memorial Day. We remember not only the millions killed in the Holocaust under Nazi persecution, but also those who have been victims of subsequent genocides. We honour the survivors and reflect upon the lessons of their experiences to challenge hatred and persecution and to prevent future atrocities.
This year’s Holocaust Memorial Day asks the question `How can life go on?’, asking us to consider what happens after a genocide.

From Wednesday 11 – Saturday 28 January a display from library collections on the Mezzanine floor, Central Library, considers the creative response to the Holocaust and the contribution that peoples of Jewish origin have made to the cultures of the countries that they were displaced to. We explore how suffering can be channelled and expressed through art, music and writing through pieces reflecting on the Holocaust and how artists, musicians and writers emerged from their experiences, demonstrating how life can go on.

At Central Library on Friday 27 January, 2 – 3pm,  Dr Hannah Holtschneider from the University of Edinburgh is delivering a talk entitled `Holocaust Memorial Day – `How can life go on? The long way home’, reflecting on the aftermath of the Holocaust for refugees and survivors who came to Scotland.

Robert Burns Poetry Competition

Our friends in Dunedin (Edinburgh’s twin city) would love some entries from Edinburgh for this year’s Robert Burns Poetry Competition. Why not give it a go? You can get lots of inspiration from our Edinburgh and Scottish Collection or from the  Robert Burns exhibition on Capital Collections.

Portrait of Robert Burns

Robert Burns

 

Find out how to enter the competition, there is still plenty of time as the closing date isn’t until 4th January,

Robert Burns Competition Poster