Randolph Caldecott: An illustrator’s perspective

Our latest exhibition on Capital Collections, Randolph Caldecott: An illustrator’s perspective, was created by Ashley Burch an Art History postgraduate student at the University of Edinburgh. She completed the research for the exhibition as part of the collaborative internship programme between the University and Central Library.

Ashley was drawn to the Library’s children’s illustrated books collection and in particular to the work of Randolph Caldecott (1846-1886). Caldecott is perhaps best known for his children’s book illustrations that feature traditional nursery rhymes and songs, however this exhibition centres on images from the ‘Sketchbook of R. Caldecott’s’ (1883) and the posthumous ‘Graphic Pictures’ (1891). Both books are designed to give the impression of a diary or travel journal and are supplemented with Caldecott’s own written excerpts. This technique gives viewers the chance to experience Caldecott’s thought processes as he created his illustrations.

Mr. Chumley's holidays

Many of the sketches in this exhibition serve as a reflection of the life and style of the English middle- and upper-middle classes in the Victorian era. The image taken from ‘Mr. Chumley’s Holidays’, describes Caldecott’s observations of life and romance acquired while travelling to resorts in England and abroad.

Caldecott characteristically portrayed individuals, many of who were well-known acquaintances, as they went about their daily activities. This exhibition, An illustrator’s perspective, seeks to not only illuminate the carefree jovial tone of Caldecott’s work, but also provide a glimpse of the man behind the illustrations.

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